Wednesday, 29 January 2014

8 of the most overlooked megalithic sites


1. Gobekli Tepe, Turkey


Gobekli Tepe, Turkey
Gobekli Tepe , Turkey                                                                                           Photo Credit: Berthold Steinhilber  


These baffling ancient ruins amazed the archaeologists due to the fact that their age is more than 11 000 years. According to some of the researchers the main purpose of the site was to be a place for worship. What the excavations revealed was curiously-shaped stones, weird animal carvings – foxes, lizards (some of which are supposed to be from different geographical regions). The scale of the settlement is impressive as still most of the structures are to be unearthed. Maybe they will provide more clues about the prehistoric builders and their culture. 

2. Baalbek, Lebanon 

Stone of the Pregnant Woman, Lebanon
              Stone of the Pregnant Woman, Baalbek

The colossal temple of Jupiter was created by the Romans and nearby lies the famous Stone of the Pregnant Woman, weighing more than a 1000 tonnes. It is one of the largest quarried blocks and can be a challenge even for modern cranes. 

3. Puma Punku, Bolivia 

H shaped block, Puma Punku, Bolivia
            Puma Punku, H blocks                                         Photo Credit: Janikorpi, CC-BY-3.0, via Wikipmedia Commons


These stones are scattered across a wide area, precisely cut and with a smooth surface. The intriguing question is how the “primitive” people achieved that high quality of craftsmanship and for what purpose. Numerous H-like blocks look as if they were part of a giant puzzle. 

4. Hagar Qim and Ggantija, Malta

Ggantija Megalithic Site, Malta
             Cgantija Megalithic site                                                                                            Photo Credit: Ronny Siegel

Temples of Malta are not among the most famous monuments that circulate in the media but to it can be said that in some aspects they are more impressive than let’s say Stonehenge. Characterised by high, almost intact walls, some of the structures remind of multi - storied buildings. Bear in mind they date from 3600-3200 BC.

5. Ale's Stones, Sweden
Ale's Stones, Kaseberga, Sweden
Ale's Stones Source: Kristianwhedberg,Wiki  Commons

Relatively recent discovery in the region of Kaseberga which consists of 59 boulders, aligned to form a circle. 

6. Nan Madol, Micronesia

A unique conglomerate of islands, all of which man-made with canals running between them. It was estimated that 250 million tons of basalt logs were laid for the foundations of city. There are many legends in the local folklore about the origin of the place and one of them claims that there is an underwater tunnel, connecting the islands. However, up to this day it hasn’t been found. 

Nan Madol ruins, Micronesia
Nan Madol ruins               Source: Tara Sturm




7. Gudong Padang, Indonesia

As is the case with similar ancient monuments it has been studied because of its exact astronomical position and the composition of the materials (cement) used. The conclusions of the scientists from the conducted research onsite are that this megalith can rewrite the history of the whole region. 

Gudong Padang, Indonesia
  Gudong Padang     Source:  Mohammad Fadli, Wiki Commons





8. Kaimanawa wall, New Zealand

The site struck controversy when it first gained media attention – some claim this is a remnant of an unknown civilization and technology which predates the Maori. The opponents, however, are sceptical and say that the wall is just a natural formation. Decide for yourself!
Kaimanawa Wall, New Zealand
                     Kaimanawa Wall                      Source 














Feel free to expand the list...            

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